System Concepts, The “Go” Rapid Transit System Concept

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  • Go PRT

Problem:

Transportation systems typically rely on the ground level or on a single elevated route for moving people and freight, and typically don’t take advantage of the space above and below it for capacity expansion, as a multistory building does.  These factors contribute to congestion, when traffic is confined to narrow corridors, and exacerbated by stop and go intersections.  Solutions such as some proposed Person Rapid Transportation (PRT) systems also avoid taking this advantage, and in addition, rely on expensive single line elevated infrastructure.

Another Solution:

A PRT type system constructed with interchangeable-modular components to take advantage of vertical and horizontal expansion capabilities – to create a network of redundant routes allowing individual cars to navigate and seek the more effective path and without stopping until reaching a pre-programmed destination.  This structure and resulting network provides great flexibility when various factors contribute to potential traffic increases in an area.  These interchangeable and modular poles can be stacked and the bracket arms and tracks can be added quickly to relieve any potential congestion that may occur.  And these components can also be easily removed and placed elsewhere in the network when traffic decreases. And when technology and economics warrant an upgrade – a new system can be installed in lieu of, or in addition to, the exiting network.

Stations can be neighborhood based and can spread both horizontally and vertically to accommodate loading and unloading and even at ground level depending on need.  This network also provides flexibility allowing stations to be placed inside buildings and on any floor such as in department stores, apartment buildings, condos and offices and without any large visual impact to the building.  Additional flexibility allows for cars to be individually owned and stations to be as small and personal – as in one’s own home.

This system was modeled in SolidWorks and is an example of Multibody modeling where individual components of the structure, which are interrelated (like the poles, bracket arms and tracks), are designed referencing 3 basic Design Sketches at the top of the part Feature Manager.